Friday, September 25, 2009

Salieri - Overtures - Czecho-Slovak RSO - Dittrich









Salieri - Overtures - Czecho-Slovak RSO - Dittrich
Baroque | Eac, flac, cue | log, cover | 1 CD, 245 MB
August 22, 1994 | Naxos | RapidShare



Antonio Salieri (18 August 1750 – 7 May 1825) was a Venetian composer and conductor. As the Austrian imperial Kapellmeister from 1788 to 1824, he was one of the most important and famous musicians of his time.


Born and raised in a prosperous family of merchants in Legnago, Salieri studied violin, and, with his parents, he moved to Padua, then to Venice, where he studied thoroughbass with Giovanni Battista Pescetti. There, he met Florian Leopold Gassmann in 1766, who invited him to attend the court of Vienna, and there trained him in composition based on Johann Joseph Fux's Gradus ad Parnassum. Salieri remained in Vienna for the rest of his life. In 1774, after Gassmann's death, Salieri was appointed court composer by Emperor Joseph II. He married Therese von Helferstorfer on 10 October 1774. The couple had eight children, only three of whom survived Salieri; his only son, Alois, died in 1805. Salieri became Royal and Imperial Kapellmeister in 1788, a post that he held till 1824. He was president of the "Tonkünstler-Societät" (society of musical artists) from 1788 to 1795, vice-president after 1795, and in charge of its concerts until 1818.

Salieri

Salieri attained an elevated social standing and was frequently associated with other celebrated composers, such as Joseph Haydn and Louis Spohr. He played an important role in late 18th and early 19th century classical music. He was a teacher to many famous composers, including Ludwig van Beethoven, Carl Czerny, Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Franz Liszt, Giacomo Meyerbeer, Ignaz Moscheles, Franz Schubert, and Franz Xaver Süssmayr. He also taught Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's younger son, Franz Xaver, some years after Mozart's death.

Salieri died in Vienna and was buried in the Matzleinsdorfer Friedhof (his remains were later transferred to the Zentralfriedhof). At his funeral service, his own Requiem in C minor - composed in 1804 - was performed for the first time. His monument is adorned by a poem written by Joseph Weigl, one of his pupils:

Rest in peace! Uncovered by dust
Eternity shall bloom for you.
Rest in peace! In eternal harmonies
Your spirit now is dissolved.
It expressed itself in enchanting notes,
Now it is floating to everlasting beauty.

Original German poem:

Ruh sanft! Vom Staub entblößt,
Wird Dir die Ewigkeit erblühen.
Ruh sanft! In ew’gen Harmonien
Ist nun Dein Geist gelöst.
Er sprach sich aus in zaubervollen Tönen,
Jetzt schwebt er hin zum unvergänglich Schönen.

Tracks:
01 - Antonio Salieri, Michael Dittrich, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra - Il Talismano (03:17)
02 - Antonio Salieri, Michael Dittrich, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra - Eraclito e Domocrito (03:51)
03 - Antonio Salieri, Michael Dittrich, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra - Cesare in Farmacusa (04:48)
04 - Antonio Salieri, Michael Dittrich, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra - Il Ricco d'un giorno (03:44)
05 - Antonio Salieri, Michael Dittrich, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra - La Secchia rapita (06:20)
06 - Antonio Salieri, Michael Dittrich, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra - Axur, Re d'Ormus (03:20)
07 - Antonio Salieri, Michael Dittrich, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra - Les Danaides (05:48)
08 - Antonio Salieri, Michael Dittrich, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra - Don Chisciotte alle nozze di Gamace (07:03)
09 - Antonio Salieri, Michael Dittrich, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra - La Grotta di Trofonio (05:40)
10 - Antonio Salieri, Michael Dittrich, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra - Il Moro (02:53)
11 - Antonio Salieri, Michael Dittrich, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra - Armida (05:56)
12 - Antonio Salieri, Michael Dittrich, Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra - L'Angiolina (05:03)




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